DIY Interior Design,  Interiors On A Budget

Rental kitchen Flooring Re-vamp DIY!

It’s time for me to confess… I’ve been hiding something from you.

I’ve been avoiding this for some time now. Literally, I’ve been physically avoiding my kitchen since I moved into this apartment. The main feature of the kitchen that upset me so so much was the absolutely hideous vomit green vinyl floor that has surprisingly seen better days.

For the last year or so I’ve been fantasising about what life would be like if I owned this apartment and all the things I’d be able to do to it without fear of repercussion. Until recently during my yearly house inspection with the real estate agent, I suddenly found the confidence to ask the big question; “Can I replace that fugly floor?” (okay, I might be paraphrasing). And the answer was “let me check with the owner…” and then a week later, the answer was “yes!”.

 SAY GOODBYE TO THIS HIDEOUS VOMIT FLOOR.
SAY GOODBYE TO THIS HIDEOUS VOMIT FLOOR.

I know, you probably think I’m crazy investing money in replacing my rental apartment’s kitchen floor. Now, before you get excited I replaced the lino with more lino. But, the new lino is much cuter and only cost me a total of $120 which I think is pretty reasonable considering how happy it makes me. In order to keep costs as low as possible due to the uncertain nature of living in a rental property, I did the labour myself.

That’s right, you’re strapped in for another Interiors Girl DIY tutorial!

STEP 1 | MEASURE UP YOUR KITCHEN! Your first step is to figure out how much vinyl flooring to buy for your space. It will help to draw a little sketch of your space. Don’t forget the floor areas underneath your fridge, dishwasher and anything else that isn’t built into your kitchen joinery.

 GET THAT MEASURING TAPE OUT!
GET THAT MEASURING TAPE OUT!

 

 THE PINK OUTLINE SHOWS THE SPACE I NEEDED TO ACCOUNT FOR WHEN BUYING THE VINYL FLOORING FOR MY KITCHEN.
THE PINK OUTLINE SHOWS THE SPACE I NEEDED TO ACCOUNT FOR WHEN BUYING THE VINYL FLOORING FOR MY KITCHEN.

 

STEP 2 | BUY YOUR FLOORING! I did a lot of research and searching the find a cute vinyl flooring option that was also affordable. I found a lot of designer ranges that would have been adorable but they were just out of my budget. I ended up deciding to keep it simple with a black & checker pattern from Bunnings. It was easy for me to select & buy without having to pay for expensive shipping etc. (you can’t go wrong with a simple black & white checker pattern!)

STEP 3 | START CUTTING! I decided to cut out the shape of my vinyl while my existing flooring was still in place JUST incase I made a terrible mistake and had to start over. I did this by starting in 1 corner and measuring every single corner exactly. I left about an extra 2 inches on every measurement so that I could trim the vinyl really exactly at the last second.

STEP 4 | DEMO TIME! Now this was the fun part. I was a little bit anxious about what I was going to find underneath this 30 something year old vinyl flooring but thankfully the family of cockroaches I had visualised didn’t exist. Using a blade-knife, I cut away and pulled up all of the old flooring (very satisfying).

STEP 5 | TRANSFORMATION TIME! Once you’ve got your naked kitchen floor (mine was bare concrete) give it a bit of a clean. I used a vacuum cleaner which did a perfectly good job! Then place your vinyl flooring down. Using a metal ruler and a blade-knife, trim down the edges as you move around making sure you’ve got a perfect fit for your space.

STEP 6 | MAKE IT STICK! Using double sided table (purchased at Bunnings!) Stick down the edges to your floor – You don’t need to stick down every edge, just the larger surfaces will do!

STEP 7 | FINISH IT UP! I decided to give my space a little added detail by bordering the flooring with a black fabric tape. This gave my floor a little bit more of a tailored finish, it also disguised any wobbly lines that I may have made while trimming around the floor. (I swear, its perfect under there!)

And that’s it! This took me roughly 3-4 hours to complete without taking any breaks. Make sure you’re wearing comfy clothes and have some water nearby because this is 4 hours of serious manual labour.

Phew!

Until next time! xx